Dr Katrina Newbiggin

Dr Katrina Newbigin

Diagnostic Radiologist

BSc (UQ), MBBS (UQ), FRANZCR

A medical graduate from the University of Queensland, Dr Katrina Newbigin completed her radiology training at the Royal Brisbane Hospital.  She completed fellowship training in Cardiac Imaging and Chest imaging in Ottawa, Canada.

Dr Newbigin holds level III accreditation with the Society of Cardiac MRI and has level A Cardiac CT accreditation.  She is also accredited in TAVR work up and is an integral part of the Wesley TAVR team.  Her current cardiac research interest is in the use of T1 mapping techniques to better understand cardiomyopathies.

Dr Newbigin is a member of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand and a radiology representative to the Coal Board Collaborative Group. She has a keen interest in Interstitial and Occupational Lung disease, being one of the first Australian radiologists to attain the difficult NIOSH B reader certification.  Dr Newbigin is the principal investigator for ongoing research into the resurgence of coal worker’s pneumoconiosis in Queensland.

Published Research

PUBLICATION LINK UCMI RESEARCHERS RESEARCH DESCRIPTION DATE OF PUBLICATION
Dr Rhiannon McBean

Dr Katrina Newbigin

Radiological appearance of coal mine dust lung diseases in Australian workers

Coal Mine Dust Lung Disease (CMDLD) encompasses a spectrum of lung diseases caused by prolonged exposure to coal mine dust. CMDLD include coal workers' pneumoconiosis (black lung) and silicosis. This review presents high‐resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images from men diagnosed with a CMDLD since the resurgence of these diseases in Queensland in 2015.

September
2018
Dr Katrina Newbigin

Dr Rhiannon McBean

Mr Jacob Keenan

Aortic Valve Calcium Scoring as a Predictor of Paravalvular Leakage in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an evolving alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement. Paravalvular leakage is one of the most common periprocedural complications involved in TAVR, leading to insertions of a pacemaker in some patients. Novel cardiac imaging techniques, including aortic valve calcium scoring, are being investigated as a tool in pre-procedural planning for TAVR. Quantification of total calcium burden of the aortic valve has been associated with post–TAVR paravalvular leak. Asymmetrical distribution of disease is an independent risk. Involvement of the non–coronary cusp, rather than total calcium burden is associated with risk for pacemaker insertion. At our imaging centre individual and total aortic valve calcium score is measured in 3-mm thickness-slice computed tomography (CT) images before TAVR using a colour map

August
2018
Dr Katrina Newbigin

Dr Rhiannon McBean

Novel MRI of mediastinal masses: internal differentiation of a thymoma and lymphoma with T1 and T2 mapping

This case report details two middle-aged women who each presented with a tumour of similar size and appearance when assessed with routine imaging. With the application of a novel MRI imaging technique, called T1 and T2 mapping, we were able to differentiate the internal properties of these tumours prior to surgery. Further research into this method may one day lead to “non-invasive biopsy” where tumours can be typed with imaging, rather than requiring analyse of tissue samples taken with invasive methods.

April
2018
Dr Rhiannon McBean

Dr Katrina Newbigin

Mr Rohan Tollenaere

Mid-Cavity Variant Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy—Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a syndrome characterised by abnormalities in heart function which is often brought on by severe stress or shock, giving it the name “broken heart syndrome”. Imaging is an excellent way to diagnose this syndrome, and in the case report described we detail, for the first time, the MRI appearance of a rare form of this syndrome.

April
2018
Dr Katrina Newbigin Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia: a rare subtype of premalignant pulmonary carcinoid

Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) is a rare condition, with approximately 200 cases reported worldwide since its first description in 1992. DIPNECH is believed to be a pre-cancerous condition in which neuroendocrine cells grow in the lungs. When medical imaging is done most patients with DIPNECH have so many small spots of cells in their lungs (nodules) that the Radiologist can not count them ("innumerable"). The cause of DIPNECH is unknown and understanding of the clinical course is limited due to small case series; however, it appears to predominantly affect non‐smoking middle‐aged women. Diagnosis is often delayed with an average length of 10 years of symptoms prior to diagnosis. Here we review the literature and present a case of a 66 year old male who presented with chronic shortness of breath and was diagnosed with DIPNECH.

October
2017
Dr Katrina Newbigin Interim analysis of the resurgence of pneumoconiosis in Australian coal and other underground miners

For many years pneumoconiosis (often called "black lung") was believed to be eradicated in Queensland. In 2015, this myth was dispelled, upheaving the mining and medical communities. Here we present a review of 13 Australian miners recently diagnosed with CWP or silicosis following the re-identification of these diseases. The focus of this small interim review was the medical imaging pattern of these cases with different patterns observed between the two diagnosis sub-types.

October
2017
A/Prof David Wong

Dr Katrina Newbigin

Multi-modality imaging to diagnose isolated cardiac sarcoidosis and determine regional inflammatory activity levels

Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare disease which can cause cardiac failure and is associated with poor prognosis if untreated. Early diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is of great clinical importance, as treatment with steroids can improve symptoms and survival rates. Here we report how to diagnose cardiac sarcoidosis using a non-invasive diagnostic imaging approach.

October
2017
Dr Katrina Newbigin Dramatic Normalization of the Echocardiographic Pulmonary-to-Left Atrial Ratio with Thrombolysis in a Case of Life-Threatening Submassive Pulmonary Emboli

This case reports describes the ECG imaging features of a patient who presented with a massive pulmonary emboli (blot clot in the lungs). With treatment using thrombolysis the patient's symptoms and heart function were improved. One month later the patient had made a full recovery.

August
2017
Dr Katrina Newbigin Regression of cardiac amyloidosis following stem cell transplantation a comparison between echocardiography and cardiac magnetic imaging in long term survivors

Cardiac amyloidis is the build-up of protein in the heart and is a serious condition with poor survival for patients. This study performed imaging of cardiac amyloidis patients using echocardiography (ECG) and MRI, before and after chemotherapy and stem cells treatment. Following treatment, imaging showed the disease process was partially reversed and that there was a large improvement in patient survival.

January
2017